06/13/14

Guy Maestri | Art of Music | Sydney Morning Herald

The Sydney Morning Herald’s  spoke with Guy Maestri about his work for the charity auction event, Art of Music. ‘Are you Leaving for the Country’ by Australian band The Drones is both the inspiration and the title of Maestri’s work to be auctioned for the event. Money raised will go to Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy, ‘founded in 1984 to promote and develop the understanding, training and practice of creative music therapy.’ – Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy. For the auction 11 artists were asked to create a work based on an iconic Australian song. Olsen Irwin artists Nicholas Harding, Luke Sciberras and Amanda Marburg are also contributing works to the auction.

Watch Maestri discuss his work and song choice and read the article here on the Sydney Morning Herald website.

Art of Music
Saturday 14 June 2014
Art Gallery of New South Wales
Art Gallery Road, The Domain, Sydney
Performances by Don Walker, Missy Higgins and Sunny Amoreena

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Guy Maestri, ‘Are you Leaving for the Country’, 2014. Nicholas Harding, ‘Where The Wild Roses Grow’, 2014

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Luke Sciberras, ‘The Belly of the Whale’, 2014. Amanda Marburg, ‘That Ain’t Bad’ 2014

08/4/13

Amanda Marburg | ARTAND Australia

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Amanda Marburg, Medusa, 2012, Oil on linen, 46 x 61cm, $8,000

‘Amanda Marburg’s intriguing paintings are the unlikely outcome of a lengthy process encompassing photography and sculpture. They begin with a mental picture that is sought out by the artist through illustrated books, newspapers and films until the ‘right’ image is eventually located. This forms the basis for a sculptural model in plasticine, which is then photographed, and a painting created from the photograph. Marburg undertakes all these steps herself, working across two and three dimensions with varying degrees of precision; she claims she is not a good photographer or model-maker ‘but that is not the point’. Her method may be physically laborious and time-consuming, but the advent of internet technology has aided the search for source material. Trawling through Google, as well as thrift stores and second-hand bookshops, she often focuses on macabre or melancholic subject matter as a way to steer clear of benign or ‘cute’ children’s animation; ‘if it’s too happy’ Marburg commented, ‘it looks like an Aardman film’. – Rachel Kent

An excerpt from Real surreal: The Marvelous World of Amanda Marburg published in ARTAND Australia. To read the full article pick up a copy of the new-look ARTAND Australia spring 2013 issue.